Utility room pipe insulation «

Utility room pipe insulation

We have diligently insulated the pipes in our plumbing system, including all hot and cold water pipes. If you want to know why, you can read up on the rationales in the blog post [LINK] “Plumbing – energy conservation (part 1)” and “Pipe insulation.” And, I shouldn’t say “we,” because Cathy did all the insulating.

We did the same thing for the PEX tubing feeding our hydronic heating system – or more simply put – the baseboard radiators.

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This should help with our energy saving efforts and assures we get the precious hot water where we want and need it: At the point of use, such as the faucet or the radiator, instead of losing it along the way to the delivery point.

But one key area has not received any pipe insulation yet – the source of the hot water, the utility room. All of the piping running from our boiler to the hot water buffer tank, to the domestic hot water storage tank, and to the heating system manifolds, are still sitting there naked without their winter coats.

And this really matters, particularly when you have large hot water storage tanks like we do.

An argument against hot water storage tanks you may have come across is about “standby loss.” That’s the thermal energy that should arrive at your faucet or radiator, leaking from the storage tanks and heating up the utility room.

The hot water storage tanks come insulated, which reduces the standby loss. But the various plumbing connections to or from the tank (a minimum of four) are not. They effectively siphon the heat out of the tank along the metal plumbing lines. Just put your hand on one of those connections at your hot water tank – but be careful not to get burned!

Cathy came to the rescue to control that thermal energy bleeding. She put her skills to task and insulated the entire plumbing system in the utility room with closed cell pipe insulation.

Not an easy job, considering that some of the tubing was hidden behind the tanks and in very awkward corners. Plus, the connections at the storage tanks were rarely a uniform pipe size, but tend to step down, which required a lot of puzzling with the corresponding pipe insulation sizes.

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Does this stop the heat bleeding? No. But it minimizes it and slows down the heat loss, whether through standby or the delivery process. That in turn allows for more hot water to be delivered where we need and want it – at the point of use.

Related posts:

Plumbing installation – pipe insulation

Pipe insulation

Plumbing – energy conservation (part 1)

Wrestling the unruly

Radiator déjà vu

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