Pounding parkway paver

We set the knee fence posts along the street a good 12 inches back from the curb. That gave us enough room to install an paver strip that should measure at least 18 inches from the front of the curb to the face of the fence.

This would be enough room for passengers in parked cars on the street to open the door and step out. The fence in turn would prevent passengers from stepping into the parkway landscape or their car doors from swinging into the parkway vegetation.

We will transform the parkway into a rain garden. That means the elevation of the rain garden will be around six inches lower than the current elevation. To help with the transition between the two different elevations, we added a small hard edge along the east and west end, which serves as a curb for the rain garden.

A lot of things can go wrong in an urban environment. Someone could end up driving into the parkway. There is little I can do about that. But I can prepare for other things. For instance, what if someone drives onto the paver strip?

To prepare for this eventuality, we put down a solid six inch aggregate base with recycled material. On top went a setting layer of coarse sand into which I laid the pavers.

 

The pavers themselves need to have a certain mass to be cut out for the job. Some of the salvaged limestone pieces that I had stored in the yard were perfect for the job. At 12 inches wide and four inches thick they had the weight and soundness I was looking for.

 

I wouldn’t be surprised if the paver strip ends up being better built than the adjacent road itself.

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About Marcus de la fleur

Marcus is a Registered Landscape Architect with a horticultural degree from the School of Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Sheffield, UK. He developed a landscape based sustainable pilot project at 168 Elm Ave. in 2002, and has expanded his skill set to building science. Starting in 2009, Marcus applied the newly acquired expertise to the deep energy retrofit of his 100+ year old home in Chicago.

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