Fussing over fence details

My nicely aligned posts alone won’t make a fence. I had to make up my mind about the fence panels, so let’s get back to basics for a minute:

Using metal in the fence panels is a risky proposition as it might get snatched by scavengers overnight. Instead, we opted to use pressure treated lumber. We installed the four by four fence posts, and I planned to use two by fours for the fence rails.

The rails alone won’t suffice. I needed a somewhat solid fence panel to keep trash from blowing into the rain garden vegetation. I considered a whole gamut of ideas, but let me make this short.

The concept of woven fence panels persisted. Woven, like wicker furniture or an old fashioned willow basket. This would add a level of surprise or contrast, as it would not be expected in an urban context. Yet I’d have to make it sufficiently robust to persist through the urban pressures.

And this is where I had to rely on metal after all: half inch or number four rebar. While I still wanted to use a wooden material like willow for the horizontal weft, the vertical warp had to be rebar.

But how could I prevent the rebar from growing legs at night? By slipping it through a pre-drilled top rail and into a three quarter inch hole in the bottom rail. A handrail attached to the top rail would lock the rebar in place.

One problem was solved, but another one was created. I ended up with two very different fences in close proximity: the woven panel knee fence around the parkway and our typical Chicago style black metal yard fence.

Patchworks of different style can generate something visually stimulating. But in this case, creating a connection between these two different enclosures and as such weaving the parkway landscape into the remaining landscape on our property would be more inviting. Rather than passing a semi-public landscape on the parkway side and a private landscape behind the property fence, we would prefer to invite observers to pass through an extension of our private landscape, which reaches all the way to the curb.

How could I begin to weave those two landscape together? Literally by weaving. I could use the same willow material that I plan on using in the knee fence panels, and weave a solid panel into the bottom our our yard fence. The added benefit would be that even more blowing trash close to the ground will be blocked by semi-solid paneling and kept out of our plantings.

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About Marcus de la fleur

Marcus is a Registered Landscape Architect with a horticultural degree from the School of Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and a Masters in Landscape Architecture from the University of Sheffield, UK. He developed a landscape based sustainable pilot project at 168 Elm Ave. in 2002, and has expanded his skill set to building science. Starting in 2009, Marcus applied the newly acquired expertise to the deep energy retrofit of his 100+ year old home in Chicago.

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